Suggested Learning

UK women reduce skincare routines

A new report by Mintel has found that 28% of women in the UK have reduced the number of products in their skincare routine over the last year, with Millennials aged 20-29 most likely to have simplified their routines.

The biggest facial cleansing casualties include facial cleansing wash (from 55% to 50%), facial cleansing wipes (from 54% to 43%) and facial toners (from 29% to 25%).

Use of facial care products has also taken a tumble in the last 12 months, with the number of women using day cream or lotion falling from 66% to 60%, while night cream/lotion use fell from 48% to 44%. Meanwhile, blemish balm (BB), colour correct (CC) and daily defence (DD) cream use slumped from 21% in 2018 to 15% in 2019.  

Overall, the women’s facial skincare market is expected to decline by nearly 1% in 2019, falling to an estimated £1.16 billion from £1.17 billion in 2018.

Mintel research has also revealed that there has been a decline in the purchase of make-up, potentially led by reduced usage following the trend for naturally radiant skin. 31% of women who wear make-up are buying colour cosmetics less frequently now compared to last year, and 19% have spent less on the category in the last 12 months.

Alex Fisher, Global Skincare Analyst at Mintel, says: “A growing number of UK women are turning away from the multi-step K-Beauty routine, hoping to reach the same glowing result without having to put the time in. This need for simplicity has pushed them towards minimalist skincare products with more intense active ingredients, such as serums and oils. Disposable wipes have been hit particularly hard as consumers become more aware of the product’s negative effects on the environment.

"As sustainability grows in importance, many beauty consumers are deliberately cutting out these single-use products. At the same time, there has been a decline in the purchase of make-up, potentially led by reduced usage following the trend for naturally radiant skin. Less make-up means less need for make-up removers, the main use for facial cleansing wipes. It is likely that women will continue to leave wipes behind unless they are able to meet consumers’ growing need for sustainable products.”

Recommended

Festive cracker of a campaign for Baylis & Harding

GOSH gives back



We use essential, performance, functional and advertising cookies to give you a better web experience. Find out how to manage these cookies here. We also use Interest Based Advertising Cookies to display relevant advertisements on this and other websites based on your viewing behaviour. By clicking "Accept" you agree to the use of these Cookies and our Cookie Policy.